The Simpsons Monopoly Welcome to Springfield Board Game!

Children, parents and kids-at-heart can all enjoy this collectible take on a gaming classic: The Simpsons Monopoly Welcome to Springfield Board Game!

mystery board game simpsons

The Monorail now runs through the eccentric town of Springfield in a strategic race to dominate the board! Purchase and re-sell your favorite locations from the show in the town of Springfield – such as Moe’s, Barney’s Bowl-a-Rama, the Kwik-E-Mart, and the Springfield Nuclear Power Plant!

Enjoy the same thrilling game play of classic Monopoly with an animated twist! Make deals, take risks and aim to dominate the board, all in the familiar town of Springfield! The humor that’s been long associated with the show follows suit in the game – integrating familiar faces and locations with the same basic strategy! With several collectible pewter tokens (including Kang the space alien, Blinky the 3-eyed fish, Bart riding his go-cart, Homer in a Monorail conductor costume, Santa’s Little Helper – the famous family dog and Jebediah Springfield), fans of the show are sure to be excited!

Strive to become the new multi-millionaire in town (so long, Mr. Burns) by accumulating monorail stops and stations on Simpsons-themed properties (such as Krustylu Studios and in-show landmarks). Unique ‘Chance’ and ‘Community Chest’ cards offer up even more sly references and cartoon likenesses of your favorite characters! The cultural references and humor of the show may be jam-packed, but the educational value of playing strategic board games remains constant. Children can have loads of fun while learning – a sneaky trick every parent should have up their sleeve!

This is a must-have for any Simpson’s collector – but casual fans can enjoy a great centerpiece for your next game night or party! Fun, referential and highly enjoyable, The Simpsons Monopoly Welcome to Springfield Board Game is an excellent addition to every game collection (recommended for ages 8 and up)!

Girl Talk Board Game

Girls get to perform silly stunts or share secrets with the group to gain points. Points are used to buy fortune cards and the first girl to collect all 4 fortune cards won.

As a child of the 90s, this game was pretty much all the rage at every sleepover I ever attended. While the game was designed to be revealing, the makers probably never realized how revealing it would actually be. Secrets aside, you can tell a lot about a girl based on how she played the game. For example, there was always that one girl who would never play a truth card and would always act like her secrets were too scandalous to breathe a word of. She’d take a zit sticker to pass on the turn, sitting for hours on end with her face covered in little round dots. There would also be a group jokester that would go above and beyond on stunt cards. Then there was the girl that seemed to be shameless, telling secrets, performing stunts and doing whatever it took to win.

girl talk

I was that girl.

But it wasn’t always fun and games, no there was a fair amount of strategy involved. While the other girls were giggling about first kisses and dream jobs, I was strategizing. Like any other board game, there were ways to win and I knew them all.

There was no rule saying I had to tell the truth, so when a truth card came up and the secret wasn’t something I was willing to share, I’d dip into my imagination and make something up. The key was to make it believable enough that nobody would question it, but not interesting enough that they would share it. I was a magnet for the question about which boy I had a crush on. This one was a breeze to avoid! My family would travel cross-country every summer to visit my dad’s family, so I simply said there was a boy that lived next door to my aunt that I met over the summer and simply couldn’t forget. They’d ask a couple questions – what does he look like, what’s his name? I’d make something up and we’d move on. Nobody knew him and Facebook wasn’t a thing yet, so it was forgotten in a day or two. I’d get my points and nobody would be the wiser.

The stunt cards were a little harder and my absolute refusal to sing in front of people (childhood trauma) necessitated a few zit stickers from time to time. Still, I always seemed to have less than the competition, which meant my fortune cards were gathered faster and my odds of winning significantly increased. I must say though, the fortune cards were not right. My life didn’t wind up anything like the game predicted.

From a nostalgia standpoint, I’d love to get my hands on a copy of Girl Talk. It would be fun to have a 90s themed party and bring it out. Everyone could put on their best wind pants and put their hair up in scrunchies while chatting about crushes and reliving our childhoods.